Nature art video content for healthcare waiting rooms and patient bedside monitors now available for licensed use

We have had a lot of requests to create content for TV monitors in healthcare waiting areas and patient rooms. So, I am really excited to share an example of what we are working on.  This is a 5-minute loop demo featuring gorgeous nature scenes shot in time-lapsed, slow motion, steady-cam cinematography.  The artist is an Emmy Award winning cinematographer we have partnered with.  It is specifically created for hospitals, medical centers, senior care and behavioral health environments. Based on the philosophy of Evidenced Based Design, this stunning video is designed to calm, sooth and improve patient outcomes.

This content is plug-and-play ready in any format required (from the cloud, Blu-ray, m4, and the new gold standard 14K).  Also available without sound.

We have content available in increments of 5 minute, 14 (the average wait in a waiting room) and 1 hour (for relaxation channels).

License Fee:  The fee depends on the quantity and placement of use and requires an outline of your intentions.  We will then get back to you with pricing.

Email me for details about licensing this video for your facility.  janelle@studioartdirect.com

This is the first in a series of art video content Studio Art Direct will be releasing for licensed use on large AV installations in healthcare, hospitality, corporate and government interiors.  We have seen a growing trend in the desire for artful content that is ready for plug-and-play.  Our initial focus will be on heatlhcare, and here are some of the trends I am seeing:

Digital Art Content for Healthcare Trends:

The average stay in a waiting room is 14-minutes.  In the past, TV’s were used as a distraction but studies showed that it caused stress in patients and visitors.  I assume this may have to do with the content of TV these days – sexist, violent, and extremely fast moving.

While the “monitor” technology exists, the content has not changed much over the years. Art consultants have realized the opportunity to showcase art, but most do it with PowerPoint style videos of images, mainly photography of flowers. This is a pitiful under utilization of the technology. So much can be done with film, video, animation, and interactive digital. The creativity just needs to be tapped.  The creative genius is in the new crop of art students and emerging artists born and raised on digital media.

Over the next 8 months, I will be working hard to discover talent and help new artists craft work towards creating digital content for the built environment, and especially healthcare.  It is an exciting new market segment we are venturing into and we are jazzed. Video installations are becoming very popular as the price of monitors and content management go down, while the public’s thirst for digital and interactive content goes up.

 

Blue light art to help memory care patients

We are always interested in using scientific research as the backbone for art installations in healthcare. Over the next year, I will be working with artists to develop installations based on science for memory care facilities.  

Blue light art, art for memory care patients

Bluish light helps Alzheimer’s patients adjust to normal sleep patterns

It is well known that Alzheimer’s and dementia cause serious problems with sleep.  How can art help these patients?

Based on the research by a scientist from New York who postulates colored light can help memory care patients adjust their sleep patterns to normal circadian rhythms.  We will create blue and yellow light in art video, light installations, and other digital art mediums.  Listen to this interview from NPR’s All Things Considered to learn more.

Mariana Figueiro researches health applications at the Lighting Research Center at Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. She recently conducted research using yellow light used as a “night light” around bathroom doors, and blue light as therapy for daytime in an Alzheimer’s unit.  She found that  Bluish lights apparently help us to wake up, and yellowish lights send signals to our circadian clocks to get ready to sleep. As Figueiro puts it, “The circadian system is what we call a blue sky detector.”  Read more.

CLICK HERE to listen to NPR interview

By Janelle Baglien, Studio Art Direct 2014

How to create sustainable/green custom digital art wallpaper

how to create custom art wallpaper using digital files

Studio Art Direct installs an original painting on sustainable/green wallpaper at a medical office building. This is an excellent example of a painterly style on very textured material – it looks like canvas. “Seasons” by T Avery from the Studio Art Direct licensed art collection.

One of the most dramatic and cost-effective ways to create large art in architecture installations is with custom art wallpaper.  The options for art and graphics are simply endless and are only hemmed in by your imagination.

There are companies who produce custom art wallpaper using their designs or stock imagery or allow you to provide your own.  Only problem is, great designers don’t like to use stock anything, or they do not have the expertise to find, select, license, and prep art, graphic or photographic files suitable for large-scale artwalls.  And if not done right, a huge custom wallpaper installation can turn into a pixilated mess.

So what to do?  Work with an art consultant who has mass connections to artists and designers and, more importantly, knows how to create digital files for production with the right color profile, correct DPI and size resolution, and has the capacity to produce and install the artwall.  This soup-to-nuts approach ensures success.  

What to consider when creating custom wallpaper?   If your project is scheduled for

studio art direct custom digital art wallpaper

Custom art wallpaper in stairwells encourages people to use the stairs by adding vibrancy to an otherwise dull and ignored space. Created by Studio Art Direct. Commissioned photography from L.Koudele

LEED certification, or if your client wants to go green, you must use a PVC free, low VOC, sustainable material which includes post consumer material and contributes to LEED MR credits.  And, if that is not enough, it must be Fire Rated Class A to meet most code requirements.  I also recommend that the pigment is a UV Curable (very low VOC or Eco-Solvent) for air quality especially in healthcare settings.

But if durability in very high traffic areas is your biggest concern, I recommend a vinyl substrate with a PVC overlay.  The PVC overlay will do a great job of protecting the image from dings and scratches.

How to choose the right art or graphics?  There are important considerations when selecting imagery for custom artwalls.  Enhancing the interior palette and finishes, imagery that speaks to a client’s image and brand, and the interaction of the end-user with the space where the wallpaper is to be installed is key.  In healthcare, images of nature are proven to aid in the healing process by lowering blood pressure and reducing heart rates. In hospitality, a more avant garde approach leaning towards abstraction or bold graphics can boost the story and theme of a hotel.  For corporations, creatively integrating brand or history is often requested.

large scale custom digital art wallpaper for healthcare

Art walls in elevator lobbies are excellent for wayfinding and provide a moment of respite during the wait for the elevator.  Photography by Z. Andrews from Studio Art Direct licensed art collection.

There are also different textures available.  I recommend a very smooth gloss or matte finish for photography and graphics and a highly textured finish for paintings.  The texture looks like canvas with the depth of impasto.

Wallpaper art as wayfinding?  Large wallpaper artwalls are an excellent way to delineate spaces and enhance wayfinding.  Fantastic applications are in elevator lobbies, stairwells, and entries to specific areas like treatment modules in healthcare, conference rooms in corporate, and floors hotels.

If you would like a free consultation about creating wallpaper artwalls for your project, contact janelle@studioartdirect.com

 

Healthcare’s art in architecture trend. Featuring an interview with Studio Art Direct in Healthcare Design Magazine

Studio Art Direct in Healthcare Design magazine

Healthcare Design Magazine features article about Studio Art Direct’s work at Kaiser

Healthcare Design magazine features Studio Art Direct in article about art in architecture and the trends in healthcare.

Art Plays Starring Role at Permanente’s New Oregon Hospital  by Anne DiNardo, Senior Editor Healthcare Design Magazine

The importance of artwork in the healthcare environment and its role in the healing process has become more widely accepted over the years. But that still doesn’t mean it’s always part of early design discussions.

Rather, art programs are often addressed later on in the project schedule, maybe even after the drywall is up, leaving art consultants and interior designers to scramble to find appropriate pieces that fit on existing walls and ceilings.

It’s a practice that Janelle Baglien, president, Studio Art Direct (Portland, Ore.), calls “plunk art.” “It’s when the building’s all done and somebody says ‘oh, we have to plunk something here.’”    READ MORE link to article.

To read a general article about this new Kaiser Permanente template hospital in Healthcare Design Magazine, click here.

Flip Through a Guided Tour of Art at Kaiser Westside Medical Center

Coffee table art book for healthcare client features 100 pages of art and poetry by Oregon creatives.

Studio Art Direct just completed a beautiful coffee table art book for one of our healthcare clients. It features 100 pages of art and poetry by Oregon creatives

With just a flip of a page, you can now enjoy many of the 975+ works of art at the new Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center.  

This coffee table art book features 100 luscious pages of art and poetry gracing the interior and exterior of the building.

It is nearly impossible for anyone to see all the artwork in one visit, so we designed this beautiful hardcover, coffee table art book for the Kaiser as a guide.  It will be given to people who worked on the project, local libraries, and will be available in waiting areas and administration.

The Tranquil Relief Through Nature coffee table book contains 100 pages of stunning artworks by Oregon area artists and 27 poems by regional writers.

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The book is themed by chapters of water, forest, wildflowers, and mountains.  From life-size bronze sculpture to photography and paintings, the book is an ode to the stunning beauty of the Northwest through the eyes of the regions most talented artists.

The book is themed by chapters of water, forest, wildflowers, and mountains. From life-size bronze sculpture to photography and paintings, the book is an ode to the stunning beauty of the Northwest through the eyes of the regions most talented artists.

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5 Large-Scale Art in Architecture Installations and How They Were Created

Art in architecture is a growing trend in healthcare, hospitality and government buildings.  It is the custom integration of art into casework, ceilings, floors, walls, glass and more. Here are 5 easy installation ideas and how they were created.

Painting printed direct to glass and laminated.

Painting printed direct to glass and laminated by Studio Art Direct. Artwork by Marla Baggetta.

Art on Glass – direct to glass Artwork such as photography, paintings and digital arts can be reproduced on glass by printing with archival pigment inks with a high viscosity.  Printing direct to the surface shows brush strokes and is very luminous.  For this installation, a super high-resolution scan of an original acrylic painting I commissioned specifically for the project was done. This scan was expensive, but worth it as it is the single most important step in any large-scale installation because if an image is pixilated, it looks cheap and amateurish. This image was res’d up to 9’0″ high, printed direct to the seconds surface of glass. Another glass layer was then painted with a soft, translucent white and then both were laminated together so that the glass was tempered for safety.  The effect is that the image provides some privacy, and yet light floods through it from the inside.

Vinyl graphics on second surface of tempered glass by Studio Art Direct

Vinyl graphics on second surface of tempered glass by Studio Art Direct. Photography by Zeb Andrews, poetry by A. Moloktov (pictured).

Art on Glass – vinyl  Any high-resolution scan of artwork can be reproduced on vinyl using archival inks and then mounted to the second surface of glass.  However, photography and graphics are best suited for this type of installation because the nature of a print to vinyl is better suited for large swaths of rich color that are not meant to show the subtleties of brush strokes or depth.   When using photography, such as the image shown here, you need to start with a very high-resolution image preferably shot in large format so that when the image is enlarged (9’0″x9’0″ in this case) it holds the resolution (at least 150 dpi at full size) and is not pixilated.  Pixilation is a vexing problem when an image is meant to be seen up close.   In this installation, custom 2″ aluminum standoffs were fabricated to add an architectural element and to hold secure the three 3’0″x9’0″ glass panels.  The wall required 3/4″ backing to withstand the weight.

Digital art printed on laminate and installed as a vertical casework element by Studio Art Direct.

Digital art printed on laminate and installed as a vertical casework element by Studio Art Direct.  Artwork by Joe Futschik.

Art on Laminate Just like your mother’s counter tops, laminates are extremely durable.  But with today’s technology, it can be used on vertical surfaces such as walls, casework, cabinet fronts, doors and dividers. And any artwork can be made into laminate.  The advantage of a laminate is that the material is extraordinarily durable. It doesn’t scratch and is cleanable. This is of special concern for healthcare projects where gurneys can slam into them and solvents are used to clean bacteria off surfaces for infection control. Laminates are created by first creating super high-resolution scan of artwork. You need to know the fabrication process to understand what the best DPI output is at full-scale and the preferred color profile so work closely with the fabricator to prep the files correctly. The image is then printed on a heat sublimation paper, and this paper is heat infused unto the second surface of a clear laminate.  

A large-scale mural reproduced on vinyl and then protected with PVC by Studio Art Direct

A large-scale mural reproduced on vinyl and then protected with PVC by Studio Art Direct.  Photo by Lance Koudele.

Art on Vinyl + PVC protection One of the most cost-effective ways to create large and dramatic art in architecture installations is with wallpaper-like murals.  The best material for high traffic locations is vinyl (the same material used to put logos on vehicles and signage on windows.) Most sign companies can create this type of graphic.  But not all sign companies are sensitive to the color adjustments and subtleties of art that is required prior to printing.  So be careful who you choose. Ask to see samples of their work.  Be sure that the costs include running a swath of the image for your approval prior to final printing. In this image, huge 9’0″x14’0″ photographs of outdoor activities were installed in a stairwell to encourage people to use the stairs.  Stairwells, like many other large wall surfaces in buildings, require that the material be fire rated according to code requirements. Make sure that the specs for the vinyl meet code.  Also, the walls must be prepped to receive the vinyl.  In most cases, the wall should be smooth and painted with a semi gloss paint.  This ensures the best adhesion. In most applications of vinyl, where the image can be touched by the public, I recommend a PVC over laminate to protect it.  Regardless, if a vinyl installation is in a high traffic area, it will show wear and tear quickly. Expect to replace it every couple of years.

Original commissioned painting reproduced on plexiglass by Studio Art Direct.

Original commissioned painting reproduced on plexiglas by Studio Art Direct.  Artwork by Marla Baggetta.

Art on Plex

Plexiglas is a more affordable alternative to glass yet gives that translucent feel.  It comes in varying thicknesses so there are nice options depending on the application.  The downside is that it will scratch over time.  So this is an excellent application for areas that are somewhat protected. In the picture shown here, the wall is slightly curved so I used a thinner, more pliable plexiglas that had just enough bend to handle the curve.  The most crucial issue in this installation was collaborating early on with the interior designer and architect to design an installation system that worked seamlessly into the casework and was durable. Just like a frame can enhance a piece of art, the finish carpentry on an installation makes all the difference.  In this case, an aluminum U channel system was used as well as stand-offs.  To give it a three-dimensional look and hide the seams, 3-Form overlays float over the plex background. For the artwork, I commissioned an artist to paint an abstracted landscape incorporating the interior color palette.  The painting was done in pastels and acrylic on paper at less than quarter of the actual full size.  I then photographed the painting in quadrants and then stitched them together so that the final output had extremely high resolution at 300 dpi at the full size of 6’0″ x 36.0″.

Important Tips

1.  There must be collaboration in the early phases of design with the architect, interior designer, owner and contractor.  This is not a “plunk art” approach – you must design for it prior to completion of the building, preferably in the design development phase, because it may require structural, electrical, or unique fabrication and installation considerations that can be very costly or prohibitive if done too late.

2.  The design ideas above require digital use of original photography or paintings, so you must license the use of the image or pay a royalty to the artist.  This is typically negotiated based on size, placement and other factors.

3.  It is very important artwork is pre-pressed by a professional who understands your chosen fabrication process.  You need to know the preferred DPI (at full size), color profile, and file type that the fabricator needs for the best compatibility and results.  There is no room for error when creating large expensive installations – color, resolution and other concerns will be glaringly obvious upon completion.

4.  Whenever possible, put the fabrication of the art in architecture installations in the GC budget, not the art budget.  The artwork, scanning, pre press, and project management can go in the art budget, but the materials and installation can be easily integrated into the construction documents as they can be considered part of the building.

5.  Lighting is the icing on the cake for art in architecture installations.  Plan for it.

Art inspired by Pantone’s color of the year: cayenne

Art inspired by Pantone's cayenne