What Millennials Want

When you think current, do you think of clean white lines, sans-serif fonts, and Bauhaus architecture?

modern
Welcome to “modern” brought to you by Steve Jobs

Because millennials sure don’t.

Millennials are very disarming to people of our generation. They are running around, going to college and killing the diamond industry. They’re buying iPhones, tweeting, and only shopping at whole foods. They have weird slang and shop at weird stores, like Urban Outfitters (which is surprisingly granola for a supposedly urban store).

But wait! I didn’t mean to scare you. Come out from under your desk.

5f959b3a4b4e05b92f87e8ff4cdae975
Possibly the most 80’s interior ever: mauve, pastels, metals.

The simple truth is that millennials are people, just like me and you (who would’ve guessed?). The only difference is that they grew up in a different time.

For the first 20 years of their life, millennials grew up in a world that was always talking about the things they missed out on. They missed out on the gold and pastel, big-hair days of the eighties. The jokes about Monica Lewinsky and pretzels making you thirsty went right over their heads. By the time they started really experiencing art and design, it was all Steve Jobs, all the way.

And now they’re sick of it.

2f9d873e5eaca4fbb60f5f7f2b838842
This is the kind of thing millennials dig: a huge gallery wall, yet its neatly curated.

So now they have two issues: they missed out on the past, and they’re tired of the present. So what else to do but rewind?

And that’s where we are today, with millennials embracing everything the generations above them are still sick of. Hair is getting bigger, “millennial pink” and “aged gold” are all the rage, Seinfeld is popular again, for some reason.

For older generations, this is old hat. We grew up with this stuff! But for millennials its brand new.

What do millennials want? Everything you’re tired of.

d28f052e20abee28b08e579d07fdfad5
Everything millennials love: dark wood, vintage furniture, hung art

Serif fonts? Yep.
Hung art? You bet.
Dark interiors? Bingo.

Minimalism is out! Maximalism is in!

If you want to go after millennials, offer what you had and they can never have. If you want to be new, go old. If you want to be fresh, go stale.

It might seem tired to you, but to millennials, it’s the golden ticket.

And just go talk to one, for pete’s sake!

Epperson-EarlySeptSky
Early September Sky, Mary Lou Epperson
While at first glance this landscape might not seem like the kind of thing millennial would be into, this was routinely picked by our millennials as one of their favorite pieces. The impressionistic and honest techniques Epperson applies brings the landscape into the 21st century, while the vibrant colors ensure that it ties any space together.

Check out our pinterest board Millennials Dig This for more inspiration.

A glaring new art trend – large scale art on glass installations

digital art glass installation for hotel

In this article, I explain the opportunities and challenges in this popular design trend – digitally printing custom art on glass to create space dividers, privacy walls, art windows, and full walls.  

Continue reading “A glaring new art trend – large scale art on glass installations”

How to create canvas reproductions that are ten-times the size of the originals. Featuring newly completed art collection for Strand Hall at Oregon State University.

Donna Trent artist, Oregon state art about agriculture, strand hall, heneberry eddy, janelle baglien, dawn carlton, canvas reproductions, fine art printing, oversized giclees, oregon artists, farm art
Dave Amundson, OSU’s Architect/Construction Manager, Dawn Carlton designer with Heneberry Eddy, and Janelle Baglien, President of Studio Art Direct in front of the reproduction of “Ebey’s Praire Farm, Whidbey Island” by Donna Trent.

Recently, I was asked by Dawn Carlton at Hennebery Eddy Architects to take 10 original works from Oregon State’s famous Art About Agriculture collection, and reproduce them as museum quality works on canvas that could be hung in the newly remodeled Strand Hall.  The trick was, the originals were small – really small, and Dawn had designed the reproductions to be huge – really huge. 

Continue reading “How to create canvas reproductions that are ten-times the size of the originals. Featuring newly completed art collection for Strand Hall at Oregon State University.”

Hotel Eastlund Opens to Rave Reviews of Art – Studio Art Direct

Bridget Bardot on Glass. Photo by Terry O'Neill. Hospitality art consultants Studio Art Direct designers. Hotel Eastlund, Portland, Oregon,.
Tracking down this iconic image of Bridget Bardot from the 60s was a challenge, but Studio Art Direct finally found Terry O’Neill in London and licensed the image for this 10’x15′ glass panel installation which floats in the lobby. Beautiful and a bit naughty.

Continue reading “Hotel Eastlund Opens to Rave Reviews of Art – Studio Art Direct”

Studio Art Direct Adds 100 New Artworks to Print On Demand Collection

Studio Art Direct adds 12 new artists and 100 new artworks to our print on demand art collection. New artists include Barry Van Gerhig, Brooke Borcherding, Candace Primack, Cathie Joy Young, Janet Rotermel, Jivi Nancheva, Lucia Johnson, Nance and Stephen Sasser, Patricia Clayton, Rick Keating, and Sandy Haight
Candace Primack’s beautiful abstracts resonate with glorious color.

We are really excited to announce the addition of 100 new works of art to our online Print On Demand Collection.  These stunning artworks range from photography and paintings to drawings and digital art. 

Continue reading “Studio Art Direct Adds 100 New Artworks to Print On Demand Collection”